Introducing Tabbie Chamberlain, author of Living at the End of the Road

“I knew nothing about publishing a book and my computer knowledge is very limited. So when I held my first book, Living at the End of the Road, in my hands, I was so excited. Thanks to Outskirts Press for making this book possible and especially to Lisa for her kindness and patience with me.”

Tabbie Chamberlain was born in a little shotgun house in 1940 at Winnsboro, Louisiana. “Living at the End of the Road” will lift your spirit, put a smile on your face and a song in your heart. Inspired by the author’s early childhood, it is a sharecropper’s saga set in the 1940s and reveals it is the simple things that mean so much and how they can fill your life with pleasure.

self-publishing authorClick for details or to purchase

Book description…

Set in the 1940s, “Living At The End Of The Road” will lift your spirit, put a smile on your face and a song in your heart. Inspired by the author’s early childhood, it reveals how simple things can fill your life with pleasure. Now, let’s take a look inside the book: Enjoy a ride with Daddy on the tractor as he pulls the disk over freshly plowed soil. Find a seat at the kitchen table and relish the smell and taste of Momma’s hot biscuits and brown, flour gravy. Follow the six Winborne girls as they pull cotton sacks down long rows and pick fluffy, white cotton from prickly burs. Grab a string and hunk of salt meat and make your way to the crawfish ditch. Join in the fun of catching fireflies on a hot summer night, or building a toad frog house in the back yard. Sit cross legged in front of the fireplace and savor the smell of pinecones burning, while eating a sweet potato, baked to perfection by the heat from the fire. Visit the little country church in rural Louisiana. Your soul will be refreshed as you become involved in praising and worshipping Jesus. “Life is a fleeting wonder. Do not disparage it, do not misuse it, do not squander it. Grab hold of it, embrace it, love it and most of all, life it.” “The good things in life do not come easily. You have to reach and dig beyond the surface. You have to endure the thorns and brambles of life, come out scratched and bleeding. But when it is over, you will have found the sweetness and beauty those who settle for surface things never have.” “When the bleak, cold, harsh winter has passed, the refreshing spring will come, bringing hope, beauty and new life.” It is my pleasure to take you back to the 1940s, and to share the real life experiences of a sharecropper’s daughter.

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