Introducing Gabriela Ionela Keller, author of A Bouquet of Adventures in History: Daring Women and Their Stories

“This team was the best of the best. Special thank you to Dana who listened to me and made sure that what I asked for was done. A heart felt thank you to everyone who worked on my book. I want to have this team for my next book.”

Ms. Keller holds a B.A. in the History of Decolonization from the University of La Verne, which she earned in 2001. She also earned a Masters Degree in World History with an emphasis on Nationalism from California State Polytechnic University Pomona in 2004. Ms. Keller was a Ph.D. student in History at Claremont Graduate University from 2004-2010. Born in Romania prematurely, weighing a mere pound and a half. At seven months old, she was given an injection of an outdated polio vaccine, an action that ultimately caused her cerebral palsy.


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First, historically the 1970’s are associated with the women’s movement, and generally we assume that women gained some rights that they never had before. Perhaps we need to reconsider this assumption. However, the truth is that women were not gaining their rights, they were regaining their rights to (some extent because the Feminist Movement is not inclusive). Keller’s research has led her to believe that the advent of Christianity led to the loss of rights for woman on the European continent. The interpretation of the Christian doctrine enabled the church to deliver a punishing blow to women for centuries. The second study offers an analysis and some comparisons of the writings of four authors regarding women’s rights in Great Britain and France centered on the issue of prostitution. Keller examines prostitution from both the legal and moral aspects of Victorian London and Paris. The purpose of the third study is to examine the life of Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, her quest for women’s rights, but more specifically her contributions as a surgeon during the American Civil War. The woman physician made her rounds through the miserable hospital ward; she noticed a photograph case on the table next to a young soldier. Wishing to cheer him, she remarked, it must hold the “sweetest face in the world.”

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