“The book has both a professional interior and exterior thanks to the combined expertise of the staff at Outskirts Press. People love the cover! The best compliment I have received to date was from a friend who is a librarian. She examined it and pronounced my book, “Very well done!” The book is just out, but I am already receiving extremely positive reviews from those who have read it. My hope was to explain the essence of war and show how it impacts families. It is the story of one little family’s attempt at normalcy in the midst of wartime separation, and it is history that personalizes the sacrifices our military families make to preserve and protect our freedom. I am getting great advice from the Outskirts Marketing Coach and am counting on him to coach me to a successful best seller! I feel that I won the lottery in the publishing world with Outskirts Press. You allowed me to exercise control over this rare and valuable historical collection while giving me valuable input on how to present it to the world. Thank you Outskirts Press!”

Onalee (Onee) is the eldest daughter of Max and Floris Guger and currently lives in Traverse City, Michigan where she was raised. She is the mother of a son and a daughter and grandmother to three girls. She put this historical collection together for all families who have experienced the essence of war.


Product description…

As the military waged war against enemy forces in 1944, strict rules of communication and secrecy were developed to keep strategic locations and battle information out of enemy hands. Letters home were censored, and diaries forbidden. Here for the first time a private and secret journal, kept by a sailor aboard the USS Yorktown, is revealed. Terse journal entries disclosing casualties and battles engaged in by “The Fighting Lady” are in striking contrast to the thoughtful and affectionate letters sent home to a beloved family. This is the story of one little family’s attempt at normalcy in the midst of separation caused by war. It illustrates the sacrifices our military families make to preserve and protect our freedom. Actual news reports of the time are a living lesson in history, while one sailor’s outlook on life aboard an aircraft carrier is both enlightening and amusing. A little girl, who misses her daddy because he now “lives at the war,” greets you throughout with a confused “Hello?” This is a unique perspective into war and a stark reminder of the way in which war impacts families.

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